Magnesium – Why is it Important for Training

Calisthenics is a really demanding form of exercise, so you need to be in your best fitness level to handle it.

There is no magic bullet for it but Magnesium comes close.

It is an essential mineral to all cells and for more than 300 enzymes in your body and it’s one of the most important nutrients for athletes in particular.

However, Magnesium deficiency is the second most common in developed countries, after Vitamin D deficiency… Most people don’t get enough of it, even from a healthy diet.

Its main dietary sources are nuts and leafy greens… So it’s quite hard to reach the recommended daily allowance just from that.

Importance in training

Magnesium plays a huge role in exercise performance.

It helps move blood sugar into your muscles and dispose of lactate, which can build up during exercise and cause fatigue, helping them recover faster.

Magnesium also improves sleep quality, helping you get proper rest during the night, with relaxed muscles and reduced cramping.

It is also linked with higher testosterone levels.

During exercise, you may need 10–20% more magnesium than when you’re resting, depending on the activity.

importance for overall health

Magnesium plays a critical role in brain function and mood, and low levels are linked to an increased risk of depression.

Magnesium also benefits people with type 2 diabetes… Studies suggest that about 48% of people with type 2 diabetes have low levels of magnesium in their blood.

Studies, also, show that taking magnesium can lower blood pressure.

Low magnesium intake is linked to chronic inflammation, which is one of the drivers of aging, obesity and chronic disease.

Furthermore, some researchers believe that people who suffer from migraines, are more likely than others to be magnesium deficient.

Recommended Magnesium Intake

There are different requirements for Magnesium intake depending on your genre, age and health condition.

Also athletes and people who exercise often need more magnesium, as well as pregnant women too.

Here is the table of the recommended daily allowance according to your genre and age :

AgeMaleFemale
9–13 years 240 mg240 mg
14–18 years 410 mg360 mg
19–30 years 400 mg310 mg
31–50 years 420 mg320 mg
51+ years 420 mg320 mg

For pregnant women the requirements for magnesium are increased.

foods with magnesium

In general rich sources of magnesium are greens, nuts, seeds, dry beans, whole grains and low-fat dairy products.

In the table bellow you can find most of the foods that contain magnesium :

FoodMilligrams
(mg) per
serving
Percent
DV*
Pumpkin seeds, roasted, 1 ounce15637
Chia seeds, 1 ounce11126
Almonds, dry roasted, 1 ounce8019
Spinach, boiled, ½ cup7819
Cashews, dry roasted, 1 ounce7418
Peanuts, oil roasted, ¼ cup6315
Cereal, shredded wheat, 2 large biscuits6115
Soymilk, plain or vanilla, 1 cup6115
Black beans, cooked, ½ cup6014
Edamame, shelled, cooked, ½ cup5012
Peanut butter, smooth, 2 tablespoons4912
Potato, baked with skin, 3.5 ounces4310
Rice, brown, cooked, ½ cup4210
Yogurt, plain, low fat, 8 ounces4210
Breakfast cereals, fortified with 10% of the DV for magnesium, 1 serving4210
Oatmeal, instant, 1 packet369
Kidney beans, canned, ½ cup358
Banana, 1 medium328
Salmon, Atlantic, farmed, cooked, 3 ounces266
Milk, 1 cup24–276
Halibut, cooked, 3 ounces246
Raisins, ½ cup235
Bread, whole wheat, 1 slice235
Avocado, cubed, ½ cup225
Chicken breast, roasted, 3 ounces225
Beef, ground, 90% lean, pan broiled, 3 ounces205
Broccoli, chopped and cooked, ½ cup123
Rice, white, cooked, ½ cup102
Apple, 1 medium92
Carrot, raw, 1 medium72

magnesium supplements

Finally, there are magnesium supplements for those who have a higher risk of deficiency or don’t consume enough through their diet… Or athletes and people who workout regularly, and even pregnant women.

There are many forms of magnesium available. The most commonly used are magnesium citrate and magnesium glycinate

The first form is most helpful for people suffering from constipation, while the other form is more useful for conditions like anxiety, insomnia, chronic stress, and inflammatory conditions.

2 comments

Submit a comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s